Step Up to Brazil 2017

CISV’s Step Up program encourages young people to take a leading role in planning and organizing activities. The participants and their adult leaders use CISV’s peace education model to guide the theme of the camp (for example, identity, democracy, or environmental protection), around which they plan activities.

Step Up delegations come from nine countries and are comprised of four young people, two girls and two boys, who are accompanied by an adult leader. The camp is coordinated by adult staff.

CISV Saskatoon will be sending a delegation of 2 boys, 2 girls and an adult leader to the Step Up program in Belo Horizonte Brazil.

CISV Angel Fund: 2016 is the founding year of this great opportunity! From this year forward, the chapter raises money for the Angel Fund, each year a different program receives a discounted fee from a portion of the Angel Fund to help make the program more affordable. Applicants can choose if they would like to donate to the angel fund during their application process. Money donated will go towards the next years Angel Fund delegation. 2017 will be our first year using the angel fund money and will go towards our Step Up to Brazil delegation.

Program Cost Summary
Sending chapter CISV Saskatoon
Program type Step Up Age 15
Program reference number C-2017-003
Location Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Tentative dates July 6 2017 – July 28 2017
Program Fees
Program Fees (includes medical insurance)  $  1,060.00
Angel Fund Discount  $ (775.00)
Membership fee (valid for one year)  $ 75.00
Mandatory costs (estimated)
Flight  $ 1,800.00
Portion of leader’s flight (¼ cost of flight)  $ 450.00
Travel agent fee  $ 42.00
Portion of leader’s travel agent fee (¼ cost of fee)  $ 10.50
Luggage Fees  $ 50.00
Luggage Fees for Leader  $ 15.00
Spending money  $ 300.00
Emergency money  $ 200.00
Brazil Specific Expenses
Brazil Entry Fee  $ 65.00
VISA Application  $ 205.00
Yellow Fever Vacination  $ 50.00
Additional Brazil Expenses for leader  $ 80.00
Variable costs (cost will change depending on situation and preferences)
Home stay gifts (two at approximately $20 each)  $ 40.00
Canadian items for trading (t-shirts, pins, keychains)  $   100.00
Camp T-shirt/CD or other keepsakes  $ 20.00
Travel money (meals, snacks, spending while travelling)  $ 60.00
Voltage converter (if applicable)  $ 15.00
Total  $  3,862.50

Your program fee includes the following expenses:

Village   Step Up  
International fee

Leader Insurance

National fee

Leader training

Leader first aid

Leader membership

Travel T-shirt

Local hosting fee

Staff gifts

Misc.

$635.00

$10.00

$250.00

$25.00

$25.00

$18.75

$25.00

$200.00

$25.00

$ 1.25

International fee

Leader Insurance

National fee

Leader training

Leader first aid

Leader membership

Travel T-shirt

Local hosting fee

Staff gifts

Misc.

$530.00

$10.00

$200.00

$25.00

$25.00

$18.75

$25.00

$200.00

$25.00

$ 1.25

Total $ 1215.00 Total $1060.00


CISV membership –
In order to apply for a CISV program you must first become a member. Our membership structure may be changing in January however this is our current structure.

Individual membership $75.00 per person per year


Flight & portion of the leader’s flight –
Delegates will be responsible for transportation to and from the hosting city of the program. This could include flights, train, or car/bus. The leader’s flight, train, or car/bus is divided among the delegates.  For example, a Step Up delegation of 4 would pay ¼ of the leader’s airfare.

Travel agent – We currently do not have a CISV travel agent, parents of the delegation will discuss if they wish to hire a travel agent or book flights independently. Most travel agents will have a booking fee per ticket.

Luggage Fees – In many cases a delegation will require an extra bag to carry cultural activity supplies and gifts. Parents will be responsible for the luggage fees for their own child as well as a portion of the leader and delegation bag.

VISA, Vaccines and Other Transportation – Some destinations will require VISA’s, Vaccines or other transportation cost like train fares. Parents will be responsible for their own expenses relating to these items as well as a portion of the leader’s expenses.

National display – Each program has different requirements for sharing their culture within the camp. Costs for these displays can be more or less depending on the families attending the program and their preferences. Below are examples of some of the costs:

Village Summer Camp Youth Meeting
-Flag

-National Costume

-Gifts for home stay families

-Posters from your country to decorate camp site

-Small Canadian items to trade (pins, key chains etc.)

-Items to display on a table for Open Day that might include maps, local crafts, pictures of famous people, snack items or small giveaways

– Booklets for each participant at camp introducing your country and delegation

– May be asked to prepare a cultural meal or snack for the camp

-Flag

-Gifts for home stay family

-Small Canadian items to trade (pins, key chains, etc.)

-Items to display on a table for Open Day that might include maps, local crafts, pictures of famous people, snack items or small giveaways

 

-Flag

-Gifts for home stay family

-Small Canadian items to trade (pins, key chains, etc.)

-Items to display on a table for Open Day that might include maps, local crafts, pictures of famous people, snack items or small giveaways

 


Spending Money –
Camp staff will let you know what the set amount of spending money is for each delegate. They will be able to spend this money at the camp shop or during a set shopping time organized by the local staff. The reason for having a set amount is to be fair to all countries; some participants will be coming from very wealthy countries whereas others might be on a tight budget. The amount typically ranges from $100-$300 Canadian Dollars.

Emergency Money – Delegations will want to set aside an “emergency money” fund for things like medical bills, loss of luggage, or other unforeseen expenses. This amount is usually set between $100-$200 and is decided by the delegation before the trip.

CISV Leaders:

Age – Leaders must be age 21 or over by the start date of the program.

Role – They will be responsible for traveling with your child to and from camp and acting as their legal guardian while attending the camp.

Leader selection – Leaders must send in an application listing their qualifications along with two references, provide a criminal record check, and proof of age. They will be interviewed by a panel including one CISV parent, one CISV past delegate or junior branch member, and one member of the Leadership Training Committee.

Training – All leaders complete two local leadership training sessions with the Local Leadership Training Committee, and a weekend training session in Vancouver, BC with the National CISV leadership trainers. All CISV leaders from Canada are required to have their first aid certification.

Typical Camp Events:

Open Day – Camps are “closed”. That means members of the hosting chapter or general public are not allowed to just stop by and check things out. There is one day of the camp called “Open Day” where it is appropriate for members of the local chapter or members of the general public to come and check out the program. If you have friends or family from the hosting city this would be the only time they will be able to enter the camp to visit with your child.

Homestays – The first day or two of camp will be only for the leaders, giving them time to prepare for the delegates to come to camp. During this time your child will stay with a local family at a “homestay”; this will give them a chance to recover from the travelling as well as meet a local family and learn a bit about the hosting country or city. CISV homestays are famous for their hospitality. It is expected that your child will give a small gift ($10-$20) to their homestay family as a token of appreciation.  Depending on your flight times your child may be required to stay at a home stay after your program as well. Either two girls will go to one house and two boys will go to the other or all four delegates will stay together. Youth Meeting sometimes does not have a home stay at all.

Homestays for Village – During the middle of the Village program is an additional “homestay weekend”; during this weekend your child will be matched up with another child from camp from a different country. They will spend the weekend with a local family. This is intended to give the leaders and kids a short break from the busy camp lifestyle. Usually the homestay family will provide some laundry services during this time.

Touring before and after camp – Touring before the program is not allowed, as leaders must always travel with the delegates. Sometimes it is necessary, because of flights, to arrive up to 3 days before your program. In this case the hosting chapter will arrange for the delegation to stay with a homestay family. The delegation is not permitted to stop in other cities along the way, aside from connecting flights.

Cancelling Your Application:

Cancellation policy – When you apply for a program there is a $500 deposit. The rest of the balance is due upon acceptance into the program. This is a sign that you are serious about the application and if your child is selected they will be going with the delegation. If you are not selected or if the program is cancelled you will receive a full refund for this $500. If you are selected and decide you cannot attend the program, the $500 will go towards financial penalties that may be given to the chapter in case a full delegation is not sent. Your membership fee is non-refundable.

Penalties – CISV International has clear guidelines on who can attend each program. For any chapter who sends delegates who are the wrong age, gender, or less than a full delegation, the chapter will receive a penalty. Usually there is a cost involved to the chapter, however the larger penalty is that CISV Canada will receive fewer camp/interchange invitations for the following year.

Our Local Chapter:

Local Chapter – CISV Saskatoon has an active local chapter. There are events and activities happening all year round. Being involved in the local chapter will help in hosting and sending delegations in the future. Some benefits of being involved in the local chapter are:

  • Meeting people with similar interests
  • Participating in interesting and exciting events
  • Giving your youth a chance to practice the leadership skills they learned at camp/Interchange
  • Being the first to know of amazing CISV opportunities in the city, country and the world
  • Making the most of your membership fee
  • Looks great on your resume

Junior Branch – The youth part of our chapter make up the JB (junior branch). The JB are run as an independent board with a Local Junior Representative, Secretary, Treasurer, and Members at Large. They run board meetings and plan their own activities based on CISV’s educational content areas. The chapter provides guidance through an adult liaison and provides JB training once a year.

Your Responsibilities:

Responsibility of parents before, during, and after – It is expected that the delegation will meet at least 5 times before they go on their trip. It is expected that you will offer your home for at least one of these meetings. This will give the other members of the delegation a chance to get to know each other and also gives you child a chance to be the host. It will also be expected that you (a parent) will meet with the leader at least twice before the trip to discuss things like flights, budget, pre-camp information, etc.

Preparing for a camp can be a very stressful time for a delegation leader, please be as helpful as possible to ensure smooth sailing. It is expected that the parents will take on certain responsibilities such as buying homestay gifts, arranging flights and collecting items for cultural displays, etc. It might also be possible for the leader to spend some one-on-one time with your child or with you. This will give them a chance to know your child as much as possible before attending the program. This will help facilitate all the new exciting and sometimes confusing experience your child is about to face.

Special Needs – It is important that you communicate any special needs to the delegation leader. If you do not make the time to meet with your delegation leader one on one you can also do this over the phone or via e-mail. Somethings you might want to consider are if you child has any medical conditions, if they are afraid of the dark, if they suffer from depression or anxiety, if there was a recent death in the family or of a family pet, if they wet the bed, or any other things that might come up during the trip that the leader will want to be prepare for. Sometimes these topics can be difficult to discuss but it is necessary to the success of your child’s experience.

Communication at camp – Most camps have limited communication available. Your child will be able to send letters or postcards from camp, however it may be some time before you receive them. Sometimes there is limited email access where delegates and/or leaders are able to send an e-mail home every now and then. Your leader should be able to ask the camp director what kind of communication will be available during the camp. Make a plan as to how often you will receive information from camp, keeping in mind that your leader has a lot of responsibilities during the camp. Make arrangements for the leader to call home upon arrival. The leader will call one person in the home city and they will contact the rest of the parents. Sometimes camps will have blogs or Facebook groups where the staff will post some updates.

Homesick letters – It is recommended that parents write a “homesick letter” before camp and send it with the leader. Make sure the letter is not emotional and sad but full of encouragement and some fun news from home. Try not to go on and on about how much you miss them and love them. The purpose of this letter is it might just be what your child needs during the first few days of adjusting to camp or half way through to get them to the end of camp. If the leader feels it’s necessary to give your child the letter they can do so. If others in the delegation received mail they may also use it to make sure no one feels left out. Try and send your child a letter the day they leave so they at least get one during their program.

Forms/Legal/Insurance Information:

Insurance *NEW* CISV Universal Insurance – Included in your program fee

Rationale for Universal insurance:

Lower costs, more benefits – costs less than most of the policies many of us purchase from other insurers and delivers benefits many other insurers do not, including coverage for pre-existing conditions, psychological counselling, cancellation of the relevant CISV International programme and crisis management and evacuation, for example.

Simplicity when there is a problem – allows staff and leaders to focus on our participants and the situation at hand – make one phone call to activate the benefits provided by the policy.  Expert and centralized global claims handling by http://www.oneclaims.com/intana/

International Support – creates an automatic support system whereby we help one another – there’s only one policy to interpret.

Confidence for leaders, staff, and parents – a CISV International driven universal policy can provide peace of mind as many of us understanding the same policy means we reduce the chance of negative financial consequences from misunderstandings.

Key features
• 24 Hour worldwide cover up to £1million
• Covers time of programme, travel to and from, plus up to 10 extra days travel (only if in line with Basic Programme Rules).
• Programme Cancellation – transport costs when a programme is cancelled due to a natural disaster or travel advisories
• Expert Crisis Management and Emergency Evacuation for political and natural disaster
• Pre-existing conditions are covered if controlled
• Psychiatric Counselling following a traumatic event is covered.
• Personal Liability coverage for non-criminal damage to others or to property
• Flight Delay – hotel and food expenses not covered by airlines can be claimed

Additional new things included in the insurance!
• Irrecoverable travel costs (i.e. if the airline / travel agent will not refund) relating to cancellation or leaving early due to:
– Illness or accident
– in the case of a youth delegation, illness or accident of the adult leader leading to the need to cancel or shorten the trips of the youth delegates
– cancellation of the relevant CISV International programme (previously, this was only covered if it was due to natural disaster or travel advisory)

Forms – CISV requires certain forms to be filled in before your child can attend the program

  • Youth Legal Information Form – This form no longer needs to be notarized
  • Health Form – This form must be filled in by a physician no more than 3 months before the program starts. Sometimes doctors will charge a fee for this service. Ask your family doctor.

R-7 – CISV has a behaviour and cultural sensitivity document. Because CISV finds itself in a blender of cultural norms and behaviours, they have had to come up with some rules that will help all its participants be on the same level of appropriate and inappropriate behaviours according to CISV. This document is consulted in cases of conflict and communicated to all participants so they are aware of what is not allowed.

Sending delegates home early from a program – There is a procedure in place for if your child needs to be sent home early from a program. Reasons that a delegate may be sent home early are:

  • Medical Emergency
  • Breaking the Local Laws
  • Breaking Rules of the R-7

It is possible that this cost can be covered by your travel insurance, however it is the responsibility of the delegate’s parents to cover the costs of the child returning home. A child cannot be sent home unaccompanied, unless:

  1. He/she is a youth 16+ and parents have consented (TWAL); OR
  2. The child is under 16 and the parents have consented and special arrangements are made with the airline.
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